Positive Reinforcement Dog Training

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What is Positive Reinforcement

The Positive Reinforcement (R+) Method of dog training is based on scientific research in ethology and learning theory.  This method has been studied, and tested and proven to be the best way for dogs to learn free from stress or fear of retribution.   We train for success…not failure, so that training is fun, fast and fair.

To punish without teaching, to force into submission, or to control by intimidation, is not fair and certainly not fun.  And there is no proof that a dog will learn anything faster.  In fact, what we do know is that behaviors learned through force can fall apart under stress, whereas behaviors learned with positive reinforcement are less likely to break down under pressure.

Dogs are happiest when they’re just being dogs!

It’s important for us to understand what dogs want if we expect them to understand what we want.  Understanding their needs, and natural insticts will help us be better trainers.   And no matter what age, temperament or breed, every dog has at least one thing in common.  Each one of them is really great at being a dog.  First, to be fair… all dogs gotta sniff, chew, and bark.  Don’t fight it, accept it.  And appropriately manage it!

Sniffing!

Should I Chew it, Chase it, Roll in it or Pee on it?  These are a few of life’s little dilemmas that can easily be resolved in one sniff.  Yes dogs sniff!   But you say when and where.

Chewing!

All dogs need to chew their whole lives, not just when they’re puppies.   It’s important to provide your dog with appropriate chews, and learn how to re-direct him off things he should not be chewing.

Barking!

Dogs bark for a variety of reasons.  Some of us even want our dogs to bark as a warning.  It’s such a natural thing for a dog to do but they don’t always know when to stop.   This is why we must teach them to respond to “quiet.”

Get the idea?  The goal is to teach our dogs the behaviors we want, rather than telling them to stop the behaviors we don’t want.   And a lot of life’s joys can be used to reinforce the behavior you want to encourage.